Friday, 26 February 2021

Why eSports Game Developers Should Consider Linux

Linux has made great strides since its creation in the early ’90s. Smartphones, vehicles, home

appliances; you name it, this operating system boasts of numerous applications. Although Linux

is making headway in the eSports world, some developers are skeptical about this OS. Here’s

why you should create games on this platform.


1. Open-Source

Everyone can erase or modify Linux code for whatever purpose. This is unlike macOS and

Windows that encrypt their codes to prevent alteration. That means you’re paying to use the

program instead of purchasing it.


Ordinarily, open-source technologies have higher quality than closed-source options. Software

from numerous programmers around the globe is likely to perform better than one created by

a handful of developers.


Even a single developer’s open-source code is high quality. Chances are you’ll overlook style

when only you and your coworkers see the code. However, you’re keener if everyone can see

the code. Moreover, it’s easier to detect bugs since many developers review the code. 


2. Low Costs

One of the reasons why all licensed online casino brands work with a Linux operating system

today is the software’s reduced cost. First off, you don’t have to pay for Linux permits, thanks

to its General Public License. Zero permits translate to fewer compliance and monitoring issues.

Likewise, most distributions come as free downloadable files. Although paid Linux versions

exist, they’re cheaper than Windows alternatives. Linux also has lower hardware costs; seeing

open-source technologies are portable and contractible.


As such, Linux tasks consume lesser hardware power than Windows servers. This is unlike

closed-source alternatives that bundle unnecessary capabilities, forcing you to pay for features

you don’t need. The power advantage also means you can use older systems and achieve

similar results.


3. Helpful Community

You don’t have to hire specialists to solve your OS problems. The internet is packed with

tutorials and documentation projects for Linux programmers.


What’s more, users in various online communities are willing to offer support. Just search for

similar posts or ask a question and await other members’ responses.


These communities are also advertising opportunities for eSports developers. For instance, you

can get freelance gigs or a full-time job. On the other hand, gaming companies can spot

employees, partners, or clients. Recognition from other developers could land you free event

tickets, discounts, and proper infrastructure for future eSports projects.


4. Reliable

Apart from program installations, Windows requires a reboot for software upgrades and lagging

systems. But Linux doesn’t use registries or sluggish NTFS formats. Hence, you don’t have to

update the OS to improve its performance. Unless there are hardware issues, Linux can

accommodate several users without slowing down.


The operating system also remains efficient when a large download is ongoing or hard disk

space is running out. Furthermore, Linux supports the following internet giants:

● Facebook

● Google

● Twitter

● Amazon

● IBM

Not forgetting its fast installation. You don’t need any prerequisites or hardware to run the OS.


5. Data Security

Though no OS is immune to software attacks, Linux has the edge over other operating systems.

For starters, its small market share makes it an unlikely target since hackers prefer software

with many users like Windows.


While the OS is easy to master, you need extra processes to execute malware. Linux users have

to save an attachment before completing it and might need permissions to open it. The

additional steps prevent internal user kill, a common security breach.


In most cases, cybercriminals spread viruses by convincing users to click on links. For example,

you may receive an email with the subject line, “Claim your cash prize here!” But it’s difficult to

open malicious files since many Linux users lack root access. Before any damage occurs, you

need to open the email, download the attachment, and provide executable permissions.


Customize Your eSports Game

You’ll enjoy developing and playing your game. Because it’s open-source, Linux lets you alter

the game’s interface. This means you can tweak the appearance to suit your preferences. For

example, you can change themes without special permissions.

Wednesday, 12 December 2018

How To: Install or Upgrade to Linux Kernel 4.19 in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

The Linux Kernel 4.19 is available for the users. This Linux Kernel version comes with plenty of fixes and improvements. This article will guide you to install or upgrade to Linux Kernel 4.19 in your Ubuntu or Linux Mint system.


Installation

For 32-Bit Systems

Download the .deb packages.

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.19/linux-headers-4.19.0-041900_4.19.0-041900.201810221809_all.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.19/linux-headers-4.19.0-041900-generic_4.19.0-041900.201810221809_i386.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.19/linux-image-4.19.0-041900-generic_4.19.0-041900.201810221809_i386.deb

Install them.

$ sudo dpkg -i linux-headers-4.19.0*.deb linux-image-4.19.0*.deb

Reboot the system.

$ sudo reboot





For 64-Bit Systems

Download the .deb packages.

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.19/linux-headers-4.19.0-041900_4.19.0-041900.201810221809_all.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.19/linux-headers-4.19.0-041900-generic_4.19.0-041900.201810221809_amd64.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.19/linux-image-unsigned-4.19.0-041900-generic_4.19.0-041900.201810221809_amd64.deb

Install them.

$ sudo dpkg -i linux-headers-4.19.0*.deb linux-image-4.19.0*.deb

Reboot the system.

$ sudo reboot

To uninstall,

$ sudo apt-get remove 'linux-headers-4.19.0*' 'linux-image-4.19.0*'


Functions in Shell Scripting

Functions in Shell Scripting - We have been learning Shell/Bash scripting and so far we have covered control flow (if-elif-else and case) statements and loops (for loop, while loop and select loop). This article is all about another important and widely used aspect of programming, called Functions.


A function is a block of code which has a name and performs a certain task. We can reuse this block of code by invoking it using the assigned name. Functions do not only improve readability of the program, but also reduce the redundancy in the code.

Defining a function

Its very easy to create a simple function. As said earlier, a function is a name given to a block of code and we enclose this block of code (or function body) between a pair of parenthesis. The basic syntax to create a function is as below:

Syntax:

myFunction() {
     ...
     ...
}

Or we can use a keyword function to define a function named myFunction as shown below:

function myFunction {
    ...
    ...
}

Lets take an example of a function named sayHello that just has - echo "Hello world!" in the function body.

sayHello() {
    echo "Hello world!"
}

OR

function sayHello {
    echo "Hello world!"
}

Yay! You just created your first function. You can put any working code in the function body and give any meaningful name to your function.

Function call

Calling a function or simply a function call, is nothing but making use of the function you already created. To call a function, you must define a function. If you don't define a function, program will fail to execute giving our error. So, lets just call the function we just created - sayHello.

$ sayHello() {
>     echo 'Hello world!'
> }

$ sayHello
Hello world!

Awesome! We just executed a block of code using a simple name! The story doesn't end here. We can provide data to the function, so that it can process the data by executing block of code on it and give us the output. Lets check this in more details.

Passing arguments to a function

In our article on Environment variables and special shell variables, we studied about positional arguments to the script. The case is exactly same here. We can make a function call, provide arguments to it and access those arguments using shell variables $1, $2, $3 and so on. In this case, $1 is the first argument to the function, $2 is the second argument the function and so on. Lets check how it works.

$ sayHello() {
>     NAME=$1
>     echo "Hello, $NAME"
> }

$ sayHello Dexter
Hello, Dexter

$ sayHello Debra
Hello, Debra

Here, we have made two calls to the function sayHello with two different arguments Dexter and Debra. Each time a function call is made, NAME=$1 stores the first argument to the function (Dexter and Debra in two different function calls) to variable defined as NAME. Once it is stored, we can use this variable as many times as we wish to.

Lets take another example. We create a function magicString wherein it takes an alphanumeric string as an argument and tells you how many alphabets and numerics the string has.

$ magicString() {
 STRING=$1
 ALPHA=`echo $STRING | tr -d '[0-9]' | wc -c`
 NUM=`echo $STRING | tr -d '[a-zA-Z]' | wc -c`
 echo "Alphabets = $ALPHA; Numerics = $NUM"
}

When we call this function with an alphanumeric string as an argument, lets see what the output looks like:

$ magicString su9Lei6aQuoh3gik
Alphabets =       13; Numerics =        3

$ magicString Phe8aebe1uf69ac0
Alphabets =       11; Numerics =        5

Thats it for the scope of this article. Stay tuned for more interesting ones.



Sunday, 9 December 2018

How To: Install or Upgrade to Linux Kernel 4.18 in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

The Linux Kernel 4.18 is available for the users. This Linux Kernel version comes with plenty of fixes and improvements. This article will guide you to install or upgrade to Linux Kernel 4.18 in your Ubuntu or Linux Mint system.


Installation

For 32-Bit Systems

Download the .deb packages.

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.18/linux-headers-4.18.0-041800_4.18.0-041800.201808122131_all.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.18/linux-headers-4.18.0-041800-generic_4.18.0-041800.201808122131_i386.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.18/linux-image-4.18.0-041800-generic_4.18.0-041800.201808122131_i386.deb

Install them.

$ sudo dpkg -i linux-headers-4.18.0*.deb linux-image-4.18.0*.deb

Reboot the system.

$ sudo reboot





For 64-Bit Systems

Download the .deb packages.

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.18/linux-headers-4.18.0-041800_4.18.0-041800.201808122131_all.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.18/linux-headers-4.18.0-041800-generic_4.18.0-041800.201808122131_amd64.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.18/linux-image-unsigned-4.18.0-041800-generic_4.18.0-041800.201808122131_amd64.deb

Install them.

$ sudo dpkg -i linux-headers-4.18.0*.deb linux-image-4.18.0*.deb

Reboot the system.

$ sudo reboot

To uninstall,

$ sudo apt-get remove 'linux-headers-4.18.0*' 'linux-image-4.18.0*'

How To: Install or Upgrade to Linux Kernel 4.17 in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

The Linux Kernel 4.17 is available for the users. This Linux Kernel version comes with plenty of fixes and improvements. This article will guide you to install or upgrade to Linux Kernel 4.17 in your Ubuntu or Linux Mint system.



Installation

For 32-Bit Systems

Download the .deb packages.

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.17/linux-headers-4.17.0-041700_4.17.0-041700.201806041953_all.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.17/linux-headers-4.17.0-041700-generic_4.17.0-041700.201806041953_i386.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.17/linux-image-4.17.0-041700-generic_4.17.0-041700.201806041953_i386.deb

Install them.

$ sudo dpkg -i linux-headers-4.17.0*.deb linux-image-4.17.0*.deb

Reboot the system.

$ sudo reboot





For 64-Bit Systems

Download the .deb packages.

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.17/linux-headers-4.17.0-041700_4.17.0-041700.201806041953_all.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.17/linux-headers-4.17.0-041700-generic_4.17.0-041700.201806041953_amd64.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.17/linux-image-unsigned-4.17.0-041700-generic_4.17.0-041700.201806041953_amd64.deb

Install them.

$ sudo dpkg -i linux-headers-4.17.0*.deb linux-image-4.17.0*.deb

Reboot the system.

$ sudo reboot

To uninstall,

$ sudo apt-get remove 'linux-headers-4.17.0*' 'linux-image-4.17.0*'

How To: Install or Upgrade to Linux Kernel 4.16 in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

The Linux Kernel 4.16 is available for the users. This Linux Kernel version comes with plenty of fixes and improvements. This article will guide you to install or upgrade to Linux Kernel 4.16 in your Ubuntu or Linux Mint system.



Installation

For 32-Bit Systems

Download the .deb packages.

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.16/linux-headers-4.16.0-041600_4.16.0-041600.201804012230_all.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.16/linux-headers-4.16.0-041600-generic_4.16.0-041600.201804012230_i386.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.16/linux-image-4.16.0-041600-generic_4.16.0-041600.201804012230_i386.deb

Install them.

$ sudo dpkg -i linux-headers-4.16.0*.deb linux-image-4.16.0*.deb

Reboot the system.

$ sudo reboot





For 64-Bit Systems

Download the .deb packages.

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.16/linux-headers-4.16.0-041600_4.16.0-041600.201804012230_all.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.16/linux-headers-4.16.0-041600-generic_4.16.0-041600.201804012230_amd64.deb

$ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.16/linux-image-4.16.0-041600-generic_4.16.0-041600.201804012230_amd64.deb

Install them.

$ sudo dpkg -i linux-headers-4.16.0*.deb linux-image-4.16.0*.deb

Reboot the system.

$ sudo reboot

To uninstall,

$ sudo apt-get remove 'linux-headers-4.16.0*' 'linux-image-4.16.0*'